ultrafacts:

parttimesloth:

redpantsyellowshoes:

ultrafacts:

More Ultrafacts (Source)

My life is complete now.

OHGOD. Bob for Robert (Bob). OH MY GOD

Richard/Rich/Rick/Dick

Robert/Rob/Bob      

William/Will/Bill/Billy

Edward/Ed/Ted    

*The name Ted is yet another result of the Old English tradition of letter swapping. Since there were a limited number of first names in the Middle Ages, letter swapping allowed people to differentiate between people with the same name. It was common to replace the first letter of a name that began with a vowel, as in Edward, with an easier to pronounce consonant, such as T. Of course, Ted was already a popular nickname for Theodore, which makes it one of the only nicknames derived from two different first names.    

Harold/Henry/Harry

Sarah/Sally

Mary/Molly

Daisy is a nickname for Margaret because the French form of the name, Marguerite, is also French for daisy.

Chuck= Charles in Middle English was Chukken and that’s probably where the nickname was born.

Hank = from Hendrick because it is the Dutch form of the English name Henry. Henk is the diminutive form of Hendrick, ergo, Hank from Henk.

enginesinrepair:

KICKASS WOMEN IN HISTORY : [3/5] HATSHEPSUT

Hatshepsut was one of the most powerful women in the ancient world. She was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt and she ruled longer than any other woman in Egyptian history. Hatshepsut was married to her sickly half brother, Thutmose II, and the two of them began to co-rule after the death of their father, Thutmose I, in 1492 BC In 1479 BC, Thutmose II died and Hatshepsut continued to rule by herself until her own death in 1458 BC. It is believed by many Egyptologists and historians that Hatshepsut was one of Ancient Egypt’s most successful monarchs. She commissioned many building projects and reestablished trade networks that had been disrupted by the Hyksos invaders of the Second Intermediate Period. Hatshepsut also led a large-scale expedition to the Land of Punt, a wealthy and sophisticated country to the south of Egypt. Hatshepsut is also believed to have led successful military campaigns in Nubia, the Levant, and Syria during her reign.

grizzlykurtz:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

History Lesson: In America from about 1700-1920 there was a social rule that said that women did not have a sex drive. According to men, all women ever were asexual and only ever had sex because their husbands wanted it and as a good doting wife they would open up for him. That said, lesbians flourished in this time! Because it was believed that women did not have sex, when two women would share a house and finances together (called a Boston Marriage, look it up!) nobody thought anything of it. Because clearly they werent homosexuals since clearly women were incapable of being independently sexual. The more you know!

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

glowingbunny:

History Meme. 3/4 Leaders → Boudica

Boudica (or Bouddica or Boudecia) was queen of the British Iceni tribe who led an uprising against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire.

Boudica’s husband Prasutagus, ruler of the Iceni tribe, who had ruled as a nominally independent ally of Rome, left his kingdom jointly to his daughters and the Roman Emperor in his will; however, when he died, his will was ignored —the kingdom was annexed as if conquered, Boudica was flogged, her daughters were raped, and Roman financiers called in their loans.

In AD 60 or 61, while the Roman governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, was leading a campaign on the island of Anglesey off the northwest coast of Wales, Boudica led the Iceni, Trinovantes and others in revolt.They destroyed Camulodunum (modern Colchester), earlier the capital of the Trinovantes, then a colonia (a settlement for discharged Roman soldiers) and the site of a temple to the former Emperor Claudius. On hearing the news of the revolt, Suetonius hurried to Londinium (London), the twenty-year-old commercial settlement that was the rebels’ next target. He concluded that they did not have the numbers to defend the settlement, so it was evacuated and abandoned. 100,000 (Iceni, Trinovantes and others) led by Boudica burned and destroyed Londinium and Verulamium (St Albans) and the Legio IX Hispana was cut to pieces. An estimated 70,000–80,000 Romans and British were killed in the three cities by those led by Boudica. Suetonius, meanwhile, regrouped his forces in the West Midlands and, despite being heavily outnumbered, defeated the Britons in the Battle of Watling Street.

The crisis caused the Emperor Nero to consider withdrawing all Roman forces from Britain, but Suetonius’ eventual victory over Boudica re-secured Roman control of the province. Boudica then either killed herself, so she would not be captured, or fell ill and died—the extant sources, Tacitus and Cassius Dio, differ. [more +]

dat-soldier:

pleatedjeans:

via

friends wait

dat-soldier:

sonnetscrewdriver:

dat-soldier:

did-you-kno:

Source

back the fuck up

There’s another story that I like about a Chinese general who had to defend a city with only a handful of soldiers from a huge enemy horde that was in all likelihood going to steamroll the place flat within hours of showing up.

So when said horde did arrive, they saw the general sitting outside the city’s open gates, drinking tea. The horde sent a couple of emissaries over to see what was what, and the general greeted them cheerfully and invited them all to come and take tea with him.

The horde decided that this was a scenario that had “MASSIVE FUCKING TRAP” written all over it in beautiful calligraphy and promptly fucked off.

Whoever that general was, he was clearly the Ancient Chinese equivalent of Sam Vimes.

did he just invite us over for tea nah man i’m out

aviationfixation:

Sarla Thakral was first Indian woman to fly. Born in 1914, she earned an aviation pilot license in 1936 at the age of 21. After obtaining the initial license, she completed one thousand hours of flying. While she was working towards a commercial pilot license, World War II broke out and civil training was suspended. Later, her husband, the first Indian to earn an airmail pilot’s license, died in a crash. She abandoned her plans to become a commercial pilot and joined the Mayo School of Art in Lahore, where she trained in the Bengal school of painting and obtained a diploma in fine arts. (Wiki)

queerallyear:

gotta love vintage lesbians

isympathizewithlinus:

revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it

Amazing that they didn’t even conceive of any kind of simplified lines or reductionism in fashion at all.  They assumed that no matter what, we’d always use yards and yards and yards of fabric for every outfit. 

AI